Architecture and Its Sculpture in Viceregal Mexico

Architecture And Its Sculpture In Viceregal Mexico
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Physical Description x, p. Published Austin : University of Texas Press, Language English.

Hispanic American Historical Review

Author Mullen, Robert James. Edition 1st ed. Subjects Architecture, Colonial -- Mexico. Architecture -- Mexico. Decoration and ornament, Architectural -- Mexico. Summary From monumental cathedrals to simple parish churches, perhaps as many as , churches and civic buildings were constructed in Mexico during the viceregal or colonial period Many of these structures remain today as witnesses to the fruitful blending of Old and New World forms and styles that created an architecture of enduring vitality.

In this profusely illustrated book, Robert J. Mullen provides a much-needed overview of Mexican colonial architecture and its attendant sculpture. Writing with just the right level of detail for students and general readers, he places the architecture in its social and economic context.

Architecture and Its Sculpture in Viceregal Mexico Robert J. Mullen University of Texas Press

He shows how buildings in the larger cities remained closer to European designs, while buildings in the pueblos often included prehispanic indigenous elements. Contents 1. Overview 2. Urban Beginnings 3. Sixteenth Century: The Formative Era 4. Cathedrals: Symbols of Authority 5. Frontier Mission Architecture. Notes Includes bibliographical references p. View online Borrow Buy Freely available Show 0 more links Set up My libraries How do I set up "My libraries"?

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The University of Melbourne Library. Log In. The indigenous people of Mexico completed immense building projects without the help of wheels, horses, or oxen. Their most visible works today are the stone pyramid complexes that sat at the heart of political and religious life. There are hundreds if not thousands of these pyramids in Mexico, built by many different cultures.

The oldest known Mesoamerican pyramid has stood in Tabasco for 3, years.

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The Mayans were especially active pyramid builders. Their most famous complexes are found at Chichen Itza, Tikal, and Umal. Today, many Mayan sites have been reclaimed by the jungle, but their pyramids remain popular tourist attractions. The Aztecs, or Mexica, came to power in the 14th century, during a period of increasing urbanization.

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In this profusely illustrated book, Robert J. Mullen provides a much-needed overview of Mexican colonial architecture and its attendant sculpture. Writing with . A much-needed overview of Mexican colonial architecture and its attendant sculpture.

The Great Pyramid of Tenochtitlan, topped by two temples, sat at the heart of their capital. The city itself spread from an island in Lake Texcoco and was home to as many as , people. A network of canals connected its people to busy markets and religious centers.

When the Spanish forces arrived, they were astonished by its size, order, and cleanliness. It held around three times as many people as Seville, the largest city of Spain at the time.

Architecture and Its Sculpture in Viceregal Mexico - Robert Mullen - Häftad () | Bokus

What remains of Tenochtitlan is now part of Mexico City. As Spanish control over Central America tightened, missions, forts, and trading towns appeared along its coasts.

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Since the early twentieth century, scholars have studied the colonial architecture of southern New Spain, but they have largely ignored the architecture of the north. Rick Steves. Not in Philippines? Joan Casas. University of Adelaide. It bears remembering, however, that Baroque architecture in New Spain and elsewhere borrowed elements from the classical language of architecture as a basis for articulating and ordering its own vocabulary.

The colonial presence moved steadily inland. The Spanish cemented their power through imposing cities and structures. They wanted to not only control the land, but to assimilate its people.

Construction began with forts and churches, expanding into housing and trade buildings as populations grew. Initial efforts began in small villages, or pueblos. Over time, native populations collapsed due to disease and mistreatment.

The Conversation: Sculpture and Architecture with Sandra Peters

This encouraged the consolidation of power in urban centers. Spanish colonial architecture did not arrive in the New World unchanged. In Mexico, indigenous artists and craftsmen revealed their own perspectives in their work.

Instead of the round statues popular in Renaissance Europe, they sculpted church reliefs in native styles. This mixture of European symbolism with Mesoamerican art is known as tequitqui sculpture. They soon spread to other colonies and to Spain itself. The first church services in Mexico were likely held in the house of Hernan Cortes. This cramped arrangement forced most new converts to attend services in the open air.